Exhibition

Sonia Boyce: We move in her way

1 Feb 2017 – 16 Apr 2017

Regular hours

Wednesday
10:00 – 18:00
Thursday
10:00 – 18:00
Friday
10:00 – 18:00
Saturday
10:00 – 18:00
Sunday
10:00 – 18:00
Tuesday
10:00 – 18:00

Cost of entry

Free for members and for all on Tuesdays, £1 Day Membership for non-members

ICA (Institute of Contemporary Arts)

London, United Kingdom

Address

Travel Information

  • Piccadilly Circus/Charing Cross

Save Event: Sonia Boyce: We move in her way

I've seen this

People who have saved this event:

close

Sonia Boyce presents a new body of work created especially for the ICA. We move in her way involves the exploratory vocal and movement performances of Elaine Mitchener, Barbara Gamper and her dancers: Eve Stainton, Ria Uttridge and Be van Vark, with an invited audience.

About

Boyce has a participatory art practice where she invites others to engage performatively with improvisation. In this process, she encourages contributors to exercise their own responses to the situations she enables, where she steps back from any directorial position to observe the activities and dynamics of exchange as they unfold. Once the performance is played out and documented, Boyce reshapes the material generated, in what she calls “recouping the remains”, to create the artwork as a multi-media installation.

We move in her way was created in this way as a performative laboratory, in which the audience and performers negotiated the ICA Theatre space around sculptural objects and their own bodies. Play and playfulness unfolded during the open-ended live performance, sparking a breakdown of assumed order between performers and audience. The dynamics of power-play shifted  between the masked audience, the performers and the sculptural objects created as a means to facilitate touch and being together, whilst remaining distinct.

Notions of difference and relatedness make reference to the enduring influence of Dada within We move in her. Processes of collaborative improvisation are exemplified in the piece, referencing the Brazilian artist Lygia Clark in the late 1960s and 70s. Some of the masks worn by the audience are a re-working of Sophie Tauber’s Dada Head (1920) – itself an appropriation of Oceanic sculpture. The final artwork takes another playful turn to create a multi-layered and multi-media installation.

Comments

Have you been to this event? Share your insights and give it a review below.