Screening

Parasol Film - evening screening series

22 Mar 2011 – 24 Mar 2011

Event times

daily at 7 pm

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  • Bus: 43, 205 and 214
  • Tube: Old Street / Angel

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LOVE on film: Evening screening series

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In conjunction with the current exhibition I Know Something About Love this programme of three screenings explores the varying experiences, states and emotions of romantic love. Tuesday 22nd March, 7pm Running time: 54:57 Takahiko Iimura, Ai (LOVE), 1962, 15:00 Tracey Moffatt, Love, 2003, 21:00 Bas Jan Ader, I'm too sad to tell you, 1971, 3:21 Abramovic/Ulay, Relation in space, 1976, 14:36 (compilation version) Cate Elwes, Introduction to summer, 1991, 1:00 Wednesday 23rd March, 7pm Running time: 49:54 Bas Jan Ader, I'm too sad to tell you, 1971, 3:21 Nicolas Provost, Gravity, 2007, 6:33 Laure Prouvost, Just Me And You, 2003, 40:00 Thursday 24th March, 7pm Running time: 55:36 Sadie Benning, It Wasn't Love, 1992, 20:00 Abramovic/Ulay, Relation in space, 1976, 14:36 (compilation version) Tracey Moffatt, Love, 2003, 21:00 Please note there are scenes of sex and violence £5/£3 concessions (one evening), £10/£7 concessions (three evenings) Booking is essential, spaces are limited: Charlotte Jones events@parasol-unit.org 020 7490 7373 Abramovic /Ulay, Relation in space, 1976, 14:36 (compilation version). Courtesy the artist and Sean Kelly New York / distribution NIMk Amsterdam Relation in space, first exhibited in July 1976 at the Venice Biennale, documents a 58-minute performance by Ulay and Abramovic. As Abramovic describes 'Two bodies repeatedly pass, touching each other. At a high speed they collide', with the basic principle of 'No rehearsal, no predicted end, no repetition'. The work documents the way their relationship develops throughout the performance, whilst their collisions become more and more intense. Bas Jan Ader, I'm too sad to tell you, 1971, 3:21. Courtesy Bas Jan Ader Estate and Patrick Painter Editions. Ader, director and actor in his own production, is crying in front of the camera, there are moments of gentle weeping and waves of more intense despair, seemingly both heartfelt and theatrical. Well known for his falling works (photographs and films of the artist falling), Ader strove for an art of certain truth and without artifice; his solipsistic work I'm too sad to tell you may be considered an attempt to assert an irrefutable idea whilst acknowledging his despair at the futility of this goal. Sadie Benning, It Wasn't Love, 1992, 20:00. Courtesy the artist and Video Data Bank, www.vdb.org It Wasn't Love propels the viewer through a story of a love affair between the artist and a ‘bad girl'. The video opens with shots of the two women, their body language and defiant stares at the camera suggestive of female autonomy and power. The work continues with Benning in various guises as she explores the Hollywood stereotype of what it means to be cool, glamorous and famous. Cate Elwes, Introduction to summer, 1991, 1:00. Courtesy the artist and Lux, London. 'This was one of the shortest and simplest pieces I have ever made and, I think, it remains the most formally elegant……it remains an introduction to a piece I never made. It consists of a one-shot one-minute embrace between a male hand and its female counterpart. The image is simple and sensual and it plays out its digital coupling against the aural backdrop of summer sounds'. — Cate Elwes Takahiko Iimura, Ai (LOVE), 1962, 15:00, sound by Yoko Ono. Courtesy the artist and Lux, London Iimura's camera explores the entangled bodies of a man and a woman during sex. Re-living the visual learning process, the viewer grapples to recognise these ambiguous shapes of light and dark. Ai (Love) is made with warmth and feeling rather than becoming a mechanical mapping of the human form, demonstrating Iimura's concern with the relationship between artist, subject and audience. Tracey Moffatt, Love, 2003, 21:00, collaboration with Gary Hillberg. Courtesy the artist and Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney. Love is a dizzying montage of movie frames from Hollywood's romantic dramas of the last 60 years. Dismantling the original films to re-make an ironic and wry take on the classic story of love, Love spirals from the cinematic cliché of the clinch and fade out and scenes of lust and longing, into a darker world of betrayal and frenzied, violent revenge. Laure Prouvost, Just Me And You, 2003, 40:00. Courtesy the artist and Lux, London. In Just Me and You, the viewer becomes the recipient of the protagonist's obsession, the silent partner in an intense and imaginary love affair. Prouvost's on-screen persona develops an awkward, playful and obsessive relationship with the audience and as the end of the video approaches so does the inevitable time to say goodbye. Nicolas Provost, Gravity, 2007, 6:33. Courtesy the artist and Video Data Bank, www.vdb.org Constructed from a selection of kissing scenes from 1950's romantic dramas, Gravity is a mesmerising and entrancing extended cinematic kiss. Scenes are overlapped and delivered at a rapid pace creating a stroboscopic, hypnotic effect that is both disorientating and entrancing.

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