Exhibition

Inquisitive Eyes: Slade Painters in Edwardian Wessex, 1900 - 1914

6 Feb 2016 – 12 Jun 2016

Event times

Tues-Sat: 10-18:00
Sun: 11-17:00
Mon: Closed

Cost of entry

Adults: £6.95
(includes a 70p donation)

Concessions: £4.95
(includes a 50p donation)

Under 16s/SGS, UoB & UWE students: FREE

Art Fund card holders: £4.50 (includes a 50p donation)

Royal West of England Academy

Bristol, United Kingdom

Address

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Featuring artists such as Augustus John, William Orpen and John Everett, Inquisitive Eyes reveals, for the first time, the importance of the Wessex landscape during a pivotal moment in British art.

About

Featuring artists such as Augustus John, William Orpen and John Everett, Inquisitive Eyes reveals, for the first time, the importance of the Wessex landscape during a pivotal moment in British art.

In the early twentieth-century, a group of radical artists who were associated with the Slade and New English Art Club, explored and expanded the boundaries of art while roaming the hills around Purbeck. This rural Dorset retreat played host to an informal artists’ ‘colony’ - evidently as significant as St. Ives or Newlyn, but hitherto unrecognised.

This ground-breaking new exhibition of works, produced during this fascinating period, offers new insight into the development of British art.

The exhibition also features major works by Roger Fry and Vanessa Bell, whose depictions of the Wessex coastline afford an intriguing comparison with the previously assumed ‘modern’ work of the Slade painters, suggesting that the modernist battle was, in fact, waged upon the beaches of Dorset.         

Curated by Gwen Yarker, Inquisitive Eyes is supported by the Foyle Foundation and the Paul Mellon Centre for British Art and is held in partnership with the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich (NMM). Loans will include major works from national collections including the NMM, the British Museum and the National Portrait Gallery, as well as privately owned works by Philip Wilson Steer, Henry Tonks, William Orpen and Vanessa Bell – some unseen for generations.

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