Exhibition

Dennis Oppenheim - Feedback: Parent-Child Projects from the 70s

20 Nov 2019 – 1 Feb 2020

Regular hours

Monday
Closed
Tuesday
13:00 – 18:00
Wednesday
13:00 – 18:00
Thursday
13:00 – 18:00
Friday
13:00 – 18:00
Saturday
13:00 – 18:00
Sunday
Closed

Shirley Fiterman Art Center

New York
New York, United States

Travel Information

  • A, C, E to Chambers Street Walk south two blocks and turn right on Barclay Street. Walk two blocks and enter the Shirley Fiterman Art Center at 81 Barclay Street 1, 2, or 3 to Chambers Street Walk 4 blocks South on West Broadway and turn right on Park Place. Walk one block and enter Shirley Fiterman Art Center at 81 Barclay Street

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Known for his Land Art work, the pioneering American artist Dennis Oppenheim moved from large-scale Earthworks to contained works with and about his body.

About

Dennis Oppenheim - Feedback: Parent-Child Projects from the 70s

Known for his Land Art work, the pioneering American artist Dennis Oppenheim moved from large-scale Earthworks to contained works with and about his body. These performance works included explorations of identity and temporality and then extended to include his family. He began making work with his wife and three children in 1970, in what became series of conceptual projects that are the focus of this show.

The exhibition brings together a selection of video and photo documentation of the performances. In 2 -Stage Transfer Drawing. (Advancing to a Future State)…. (Returning to a Past State). , 1971, the artist and his son stand behind, and then in front of each other. Oppenheim uses a marker to draw on the skin of his son’s back and Erik interprets the sensation, transferring it to the wall  (Advancing to a Future State) . Oppenheim then then interprets the feeling of Erik’s drawing on his back, transferring it to the wall  (Returning to a Past State) . In using his father’s body, Erik moves forward in time, and Oppenheim moves backward in time using his son’s body, making a poignant statement about family relations, projection, desire and the nature of the act of drawing itself.

Exhibiting artists

Dennis Oppenheim

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