Exhibition

16th Century Life Expectancy

25 Aug 2023 – 8 Sep 2023

Regular hours

Friday
09:30 – 18:30
Monday
09:30 – 18:30
Tuesday
09:30 – 18:30
Wednesday
09:30 – 18:30
Thursday
09:30 – 18:30

Free admission

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Pocko

London
England, United Kingdom

Address

Travel Information

  • Dalston Junction, Dalston Kingsland
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Event map

Pocko Gallery presents 16th Century Life Expectancy, an exhibition in collaboration with UK Black Pride, featuring a series of photographic portraits and a short
movie alongside other contextual works.

About

For years it has been widely reported that Black trans women have a life expectancy of just 35.


This bleak statistic first arose back in 2015 when a report compiled by the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights found the average age of Black trans homicide victims in some parts of Latin America was between 30 and 35. Although a very real and shocking information, it has since been extrapolated, taken out of context, and shared thousands of times across social media - fuelling a rippling effect of fear within the entire Black trans community around the world.


A life expectancy of 35 would put Black trans women on a par with people living in the 16th Century - an absurd comparison - but one that brings to life how misinformation can be harmful, as it precipitates a self-fulfilling prophecy within the community. This contemporary portrait series highlights the dangers of misinformation - both conscious and unconscious - and engages five prominent Black trans people to elicit their opinions on what needs to be done to ensure the protection of the trans community.


16th Century Life Expectancy seeks to unearth the misinformation surrounding the Black trans community whilst also shining a light on the bias, discrimination, and racism they encounter on a daily basis. When looking at the portraits, take a moment to reflect and understand their lived experiences and struggles. And ask yourself, what I can do to become a stronger ally to the trans community.

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