Ways & Means Group Exhibition feat. Talci Walci - Ab-Frag•••

17. Jun - 21. Jun 14 / ended Art Galleries Europe

Free

11.00am - 6.00pm

Exhibition | Multi-disciplinary | London


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New Exhibition showing Talci Walci - AbFrag Abstract Fragmentationism A new ism in the making?

Ways and Means is a group showing of 10 emerging artists, which includes the new abstract style of artist Talci Walci.

Talci Walci’s latest series of pictures demonstrate a unique graphic abstract style, embellished with fragmented linear imagery, resulting in expressive, distinctive works that project mysterious and unfamiliar overtones..

Web link to view online Flickr Photostream https://www.flickr.com/photos/120359004@N07/


His paintings are effectively the realization of highly controlled designs, yet were conceived and initially drawn with an invented technique mixed with intuitive energy, whereas his wall-mounted installations exhibit a more geometrical and minimalist approach to his inherent style of subjective communication.



From A Conversation with Talci Walci article by Wingshan Smith

\\\"Talci Walci’s abstract work evokes playful readings similar to those one would interpret when looking at clouds.

The shapes and colours are mesmerizing, and extend in bold protruding curves and angles that started life from semi-automatic drawings on a computer which were then cropped, superimposed and blocked in with solid tones.

He gestures to two of his paintings in the gallery that are side by side and tells me that they both originated from the same drawing. One is coloured in exciting pinks, greens, reds and blues. In this painting I can see elongated figures and faces, dancing together in the moonlight. It is like a party on a coast, somewhere beautiful and magnificent.

In the painting next to it, the composition is more busy, with less negative spaces. Whereas the first seems like you are looking at a typical painting of a scene, this one is like a bird\\\'s-eye view of red, oranges and browns. It is more like an ants\\\' nest in the midday heat. Placed side by side in the exhibition space, Talci Walci comments on how drastically different a work can be if approached from another place in time and space. These works are experiments of the transience of time and varied changing perceptions according to personal moods, days and environmental experiences. In this way Talci creates an open dialogue between himself and the viewer.\\\"


AB FRAG

Ab-Frag (abbr. Abstract Fragmentationism) is an art-movement term used to describe a style akin to abstract expressionism, but with graphic or ‘hard-edge’ portrayal of fragmented appearance.

Initiated in 2013 by British artist Talci Walci, the style originates from a semi-automatic drawing method combined with an application process using translucent acrylic paint.

Whilst invented as a painting technique characterized by the absence of gestural brushstrokes, the style is transferable across alternative media.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/120359004@N07/


User opinions

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Excellent

by Emma Swinn 20.06.14 22:00
•••••

An intriguing contemporary-modern group exhibition set out in two floors of gallery space, displaying an interesting variety of different media that consists mainly of painting, photography and video,
Although mostly the work of London undergraduate students, this show certainly stands very much on a par with the best Degree Show offerings around at the moment, and arguably, betters some of the current exhibitions by established artists at other galleries as well.
Works that stood out for me, were the fragmented, graphic abstract paintings of the artist Talci Walci, and the 'train journey' video by Courtauld Institute undergraduate, Wingshan Smith.
However, there is also some very strong photographic portrayals to be seen from Emma Hayes, Bianca Forte and Dovile Dudenaite, with notable inclusions of works by Daniel Golton, Jude Fitchett and VN.
All in all, this is an extremely well-balanced and expertly presented show

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