David Robilliard: The Yes No Quality of Dreams••••

16. Apr - 15. Jun 14 / ended ICA (Institute of Contemporary Arts)

Entry with day membership

Exhibitions are open 11am – 6pm, except Thursday, 11am – 9pm.

Exhibition | Painting | London


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Alan Macdonald, Manipulated Polaroid of David Robilliard, 1981, Polaroid SX70. Courtesy Alan Macdonald

Alan Macdonald, Manipulated Polaroid of David Robilliard, 1981, Polaroid SX70. Courtesy Alan Macdonald


David Robilliard: The Yes No Quality of Dreams

The ICA brings together a selection of paintings by London-based poet and painter David Robilliard in the first UK institutional exhibition for over twenty years. Born in 1952 on the Channel Island of Guernsey, Robilliard moved to London in 1976 to pursue his interest in art. He first met Gilbert & George in 1979 and they would become good friends. Robilliard would later model for Gilbert & George and appear in the film The World of Gilbert & George (1981). Robilliard was described by Gilbert & George as ‘the new master of the modern person’.

Robilliard had no formal training. He was gay and regularly frequented the clubs and bars associated with London’s underground scene until his death as a result of AIDS in 1988. Gilbert & George were at his bedside. While Robilliard’s paintings appeared in numerous gallery exhibitions during his lifetime - notably in smaller, less commercial venues, including on one occasion London’s L’Escargot restaurant in Soho – few shows would match the major retrospective held at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, in 1993. Since then his fame has dwindled.

http://www.ica.org.uk/whats-on/david-robilliard-yes-no-quality-dreams


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by ArtRabbit Team 08.05.14 18:34
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'The obvious modern-day comparison is the offbeat drawing of David Shrigley - yet Robilliard's work has less of a pay-off or punchline. It feels more open-ended, more diaristic and intimate. You get the sense of Robilliard sifting through daily experience and then recording the most vital, most subtly affecting moments.' - Time Out

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